OS Tools: Publishing data

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VO Sharing is daring: Open Science approaches to Digital Humanities

Please read the lesson script below and complete the tasks.

Questions, remarks, issues? Participate in the Zoom meeting on Mon, 11.05.2020, 5 p.m. - 6 p.m.!
This week's topic of discussion:
After having studied this week's material, which of the four FAIR principles seems most vital to you in the context of publishing data?

Mon, 11.05., 16:45 - 18:15: OS Tools: Publishing data[Bearbeiten]

Finding open data and publishing open data (like finding papers and publishing papers) are two sides of one coin and you can't fully understand how to do the one thing if you don't also dive into the other.

Before we can publish our "data" (as opposed to our "papers"), we have to understand what (open) research data actually are. Usually, we go straight to the humanities perspective and try to understand our subject from that perspective, but today, let's first take a broader perspective.

Task 1[Bearbeiten]

Read the blog post "What Is Open Data?" by opendatasoft to understand the programming / industry perspective on Open Data.

Now, let's zoom in on the humanities / culture perspective:

Task 2[Bearbeiten]

Watch this short interview with Europeana's director Jill Cousins: "What is open culture?" and read the post "Open culture – what can you do with it? – resources for research". Subsequently, visit Europeana and Europeana pro. What is the difference between the two platforms? Where can you share your data? Who are the target users of both infrastructures?

This week, I don't have to do a whole lot of work writing down the lesson script - thanks to open data. Luckily for me, there are a big lot of open data out there about how to make data open and how and where to publish them. In the last weeks, you have already gotten to know a few infrastructures and repositories that you can use for publishing papers, and luckily, the most prominent one is also the best place for your data: Zenodo. But there is quite a lot more to know about opening up and publishing research data.

Task 3[Bearbeiten]

To get a good overview of all the different aspects to consider when publishing open data, please visit the Open Science Training Handbook and read the entire chapter "Open Research Data and Materials".

Now that we covered all the bases, let's have a look at the practical, but also the more technical side of publishing data.

Task 4[Bearbeiten]

Visit the Open Data Handbook and read the entire section "How to Open up Data". Of the many possibilities suggested in the section "Online methods", which one would you choose for your data? Why?

Having studied the vital sources from this and last week's sessions, we are now ready to move on from publishing papers and data to finding them in order to use them for our research. Therefore, we will get to know a lot of discovery tools next week (some of which we have already used for publishing - can you guess which will be the first repository we will look at for discovery?). If you would like to study a few more resources in the meantime, please visit the blog bost "Open Science: Key Resources for Medievalists" (which is very useful, not only for medievalists, but for anyone interested in Open Science).

Questions, remarks, issues? Participate in the Zoom meeting on Mon, 11.05.2020, 5 p.m. - 6 p.m.!
This week's topic of discussion:
After having studied this week's material, which of the four FAIR principles seems most vital to you in the context of publishing data?

Reading[Bearbeiten]