Try again, fail again, fail better: Example projects

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VO Sharing is daring: Open Science approaches to Digital Humanities

Please read the lesson script below and complete the tasks.

Questions, remarks, issues? Participate in the Zoom meeting on Mon, 08.06.2020, 5 p.m. - 6 p.m.!
This week's topic of discussion:
Which of the three example projects is most inspiring to implement Open Science yourself? Which of them do you find most 'effective' in reaching the goal of more Openness?

Mon, 08.06., 16:45 - 18:15: Try again, fail again, fail better: Example projects[Bearbeiten]

This week, it's time for a good hard look at the reality of Open Science. And the reality is: Open Science is hard. It takes time and it takes effort, which means that it sometimes requires more (time, financial, staff) resources than are available. This can lead to the situation that the harder we try, i.e. the more aspects of Open Science we try to implement at the same time, the worse we do. One glorious example of this failure based on best intentions is the project Handke: in Zungen.

Task 1[Bearbeiten]

Take a look at the project Handke: in Zungen and try to find out who worked on it, what it was about, what were the outcomes, what Open Science methods were implemented, and so on. You can start your search on the Wikiversity page, on the ACDH-CH website, or by reading this article.

We will discuss all the various problems and dead ends that Open Science approaches ran into in our discussion on Monday. After this rather harsh look at reality, we will however also take a look at two projects that implemented Open ideas very successfully: The ACDH Open Data Hackathon series and the ACDH Open Science Café.

In the Hachathon series, the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ACDH-CH, formerly ACDH) invites programmers to solve a certain task using a specific Open Data set. The best solutions receive prices. Not only the data to be worked on are Open, but Openness is also a requirement for all submissions to the Hackathon. Like this, an Open Data set creates Open Source code, thus having a "viral effect".

Task 2[Bearbeiten]

Learn more about the Open Data Hackathon Series by reading about the first round 2019 and the second round 2020. Start by reading the descriptions on the ACDH-CH website linked here. Follow the further links you find and find out what the tasks for the hackathons were and what submissions won the challenges.

One final Open Science project we want to take a quick look at is the ACDH Open Science Café. This event took place during the ACDH Open Science ToolGallery, a full day workshop that offered participants the opportunity to learn a lot about Open Science, but also to actively discuss and establish what Open Science meant to them. (You have already watched some of the videos of the lectures presented at the ToolGallery in the course of the semester, but not all of them. If you're curious what you missed, follow the link above and see what other topics were discussed!)

Task 3[Bearbeiten]

Read this blog post to find out more about the Open Science Café. What did the participants discuss? Do you agree with the conclusions they reached? Can you find the materials that were used for this event, and could you imagine organizing your own Open Science Cafe?

After these three very different examples, we will turn to another very practical topic next week. Bernhard Schubert of the University of Vienna Open Access Office will be our guest in the Zoom meeting on Mon, 15.06.2020, to speak to us about Open Access at the University of Vienna. But before that:

Questions, remarks, issues? Participate in the Zoom meeting on Mon, 08.06.2020, 5 p.m. - 6 p.m.!
This week's topic of discussion:
Which of the three example projects is most inspiring to implement Open Science yourself? Which of them do you find most 'effective' in reaching the goal of more Openness?

Reading[Bearbeiten]